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New leader

By *orum reader  (M) 15 weeks ago

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Who should be the next leader of each party

For me the next Labour leader should be some one sensible maybe Jess Phillips

In the Tory party Rob Halfon

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*hris51234 By  *hris51234    profile verified by photo premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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I've said before Tom Watson for Labour seems to be of reasonable mind in my opinion and tends to disagree with the way things are going under the currat leadership, Robert Halfon is my local M.P he seems to be involved with quite a few things and seems to work hard and do quite well but not sure if he is up for leadership at present but maybe in the future, id be inclined to back Sajid Javid for next leader seems to know his own mind and could be successful

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*9al By *9al  (M) 15 weeks ago

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I have not heard of ether of them, the biggest problem seams to be how do we get rid of the present ones?

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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"I have not heard of ether of them, the biggest problem seams to be how do we get rid of the present ones? "

I've seen Jess Phillips on TV and quite impressed with her. Not heard of Robert Halfon. Mrs May has indicated that she will stand down before the end of this parliament. I think the Labour Party may struggle to get rid of Corbyn

Biggest trouble with wishing party leaders would go is they could be replaced with someone worse.

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*hris51234 By  *hris51234    profile verified by photo premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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Robert Halfon M.P for Harlow, probably most well known for his ongoing campaign to have parking fees in hospitals scrapped also on the education committee where i believe hes the chairman but could be wrong on that bit, at present calling for a change in the school curiculam as think he feels the currant system does little to help employment also wants more in the way of apprentaships for school leavers rather than kids having to stay in higher education at 16.

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By *ikey1973   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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There must be a great many brilliant minds in all parties who do their utmost and work hard .. but how do we ever get to know who they are?

I too rate Robert Halfon and although I don't like Tom Watson I do think he would be a good leader of the Labour party and is in touch with reality.

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By *aravaggio  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"There must be a great many brilliant minds in all parties who do their utmost and work hard .. but how do we ever get to know who they are?

I too rate Robert Halfon and although I don't like Tom Watson I do think he would be a good leader of the Labour party and is in touch with reality."

Whoever is leader of Labour is merely a pawn of The Party and Momentum, nowadays.

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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Grayling for leader of the Tories - he'd bankrupt us in weeks

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By *hread  (M) 15 weeks ago

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HearHear E K

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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Corbyn, MocDommell or Abbott to lead the Labour Party as they will turn us into a poor man's Venezuela within weeks.

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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A government that includes Daisy May and Grayling has already done that for many people at the bottom of the ladder (food banks, stopped benefit payments, increased homelessness, etc) so we're already well on the way to that.

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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"A government that includes Daisy May and Grayling has already done that for many people at the bottom of the ladder (food banks, stopped benefit payments, increased homelessness, etc) so we're already well on the way to that."

Whilst I agree those things you list need sorting they also existed under the last Labour government. Plus some of the worse areas for poverty are where there are Labour run councils/administrations. On the whole the country is far better off than it was a few years ago and it certainly would not improve if a bunch of crackpot Marxists were in change.

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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I've no doubt the area within the M25 is better off but deprived areas are suffering due to swingeing cuts in government funding for local services. This area is very poor and is Tory run - no council can fabricate money for services out of thin air. And then they offer a bung to the poor communities (1.6 billion as opposed to their 16 billion in cuts) to get Daisy's deal through.

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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But of course governments can get money out of thin air can't they? Living above their means have been the policy of every Labour government then the incoming Conservative government gets the blame for trying to balance the books. Of course Cabbage Corbyn's cronies have the answer. Marigold McDonnell has a whole forest of money trees ready to be harvested and Dandelion Dianne Abbott is going to use her considerable charms to recruit thousands more police officers on a salary of £30 per week

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By *awtyCawty  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"I have not heard of ether of them, the biggest problem seams to be how do we get rid of the present ones? "

Novichok would do it perfectly.

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"But of course governments can get money out of thin air can't they? Living above their means have been the policy of every Labour government then the incoming Conservative government gets the blame for trying to balance the books. Of course Cabbage Corbyn's cronies have the answer. Marigold McDonnell has a whole forest of money trees ready to be harvested and Dandelion Dianne Abbott is going to use her considerable charms to recruit thousands more police officers on a salary of £30 per week "

Daisy is the expert at shaking the magic money tree when it suits her purposes and helps keep her in office. Hopefully she will be available to give the next Labour government courses on how to magic up money for your own nefarious purposes when it doesn't exist for improving public services. The money paid out to cover up Grayling's messes could have funded many public services.

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By *awtyCawty  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"But of course governments can get money out of thin air can't they? Living above their means have been the policy of every Labour government then the incoming Conservative government gets the blame for trying to balance the books. Of course Cabbage Corbyn's cronies have the answer. Marigold McDonnell has a whole forest of money trees ready to be harvested and Dandelion Dianne Abbott is going to use her considerable charms to recruit thousands more police officers on a salary of £30 per week

Daisy is the expert at shaking the magic money tree when it suits her purposes and helps keep her in office. Hopefully she will be available to give the next Labour government courses on how to magic up money for your own nefarious purposes when it doesn't exist for improving public services. The money paid out to cover up Grayling's messes could have funded many public services."

Well if the Labour scum ever do get in under the Corbynator, unlikely but you never know, they will need all the advice they can get. Socialist losers spend money faster than a lottery winner on acid, and the country will be bankrupt in a year, if not sooner.

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By *illea   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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"But of course governments can get money out of thin air can't they? Living above their means have been the policy of every Labour government then the incoming Conservative government gets the blame for trying to balance the books. Of course Cabbage Corbyn's cronies have the answer. Marigold McDonnell has a whole forest of money trees ready to be harvested and Dandelion Dianne Abbott is going to use her considerable charms to recruit thousands more police officers on a salary of £30 per week "

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*Ybear By *Ybear  (M) 15 weeks ago

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To get back on track, Tom Watson is emerging as the leader of the centre and right of the Labour Party and would bring them back to the mainstream perhaps even make them a credible opposition especially with Jess Phillips as his deputy, giving the balance of “brain and heart “ similar to successful teaming of Blair and Prescott (no I didn’t like them either but they were successful)

On the Tory side Amber Rudd is probably the best hope for the “one nation “ wing but I think Dominic Rabb would best suit the Brexiteers.

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By *reatedbear   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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I'm a member of the Labour Party and have been for decades. I voted for Andy Burnham to be leader and indeed, if he'd won, Labour wouldn't be in the mess it is in now. In fact, Labour would probably be in Govt.

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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Glad we are back on track. Two interesting and sensible comments above.. Tom Watson would make a good leader of the Labour Party and bring it back to the more central ground. I also though Andy Burnham was the best candidate in the 2015 leadership election. He is likeable and plausible and it is a great pity that he left the HOC.

Both Amber Rudd and Dominic Raab would make good leaders of the Conservative Party but whether they would get grassroots support remains to be seen. In both parties the grassroots tend to go for the most extreme candidate which tends to polarise the parties rather than make them a popular choice amongst the general electorate.

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By *orum reader  (M) 15 weeks ago

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I suggested the two above with the idea we get rid of those entrenched in old ideas, they seem to me to be the best of the backbenchers so we could have some new ideas not just the same ideas from the current leaderships

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By *aravaggio  (M) 15 weeks ago

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Don't you understand the game they play, nowadays? There won't be any "new ideas". The current ideas are all in play, and the public has got used to them. Why jeopardize the job, why rock the party boat, why put yourself up as a possible failure? No, far easier to toe the party line and trudge along the well worn paths. You'll never hear another "Rivers of Blood" speech. Our elected puppets will never again put their heads above the parapet, for fear of the vocal minority who via social media, dictate the downward spiral of the country and it's citizens.

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"Grayling for leader of the Tories - he'd bankrupt us in weeks "

grayling is no leader material there has to be someone capable of running party but it's very hard to see who within the conservative party.

Hopefully a new party gets formed

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"I suggested the two above with the idea we get rid of those entrenched in old ideas, they seem to me to be the best of the backbenchers so we could have some new ideas not just the same ideas from the current leaderships"

you get rid of old ideas when you let the young generation have a say

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"But of course governments can get money out of thin air can't they? Living above their means have been the policy of every Labour government then the incoming Conservative government gets the blame for trying to balance the books. Of course Cabbage Corbyn's cronies have the answer. Marigold McDonnell has a whole forest of money trees ready to be harvested and Dandelion Dianne Abbott is going to use her considerable charms to recruit thousands more police officers on a salary of £30 per week

Daisy is the expert at shaking the magic money tree when it suits her purposes and helps keep her in office. Hopefully she will be available to give the next Labour government courses on how to magic up money for your own nefarious purposes when it doesn't exist for improving public services. The money paid out to cover up Grayling's messes could have funded many public services."

you are totally correct there

Daisy may claimed that there's no money then. Gives I billion pounds to buy votes from dup

And before anyone starts yes it's for country over a set time

But still bought votes so this lame government could get propped up

Then they get money for covering all the money useless grayling lost.

The money wasted there could have like you say gone to public services

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By *ikey1973   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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"Don't you understand the game they play, nowadays? There won't be any "new ideas". The current ideas are all in play, and the public has got used to them. Why jeopardize the job, why rock the party boat, why put yourself up as a possible failure? No, far easier to toe the party line and trudge along the well worn paths. You'll never hear another "Rivers of Blood" speech. Our elected puppets will never again put their heads above the parapet, for fear of the vocal minority who via social media, dictate the downward spiral of the country and it's citizens."

Exactly.

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By *aravaggio  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"I suggested the two above with the idea we get rid of those entrenched in old ideas, they seem to me to be the best of the backbenchers so we could have some new ideas not just the same ideas from the current leadershipsyou get rid of old ideas when you let the young generation have a say "

Who are these members of the younger generation who deserve their say?

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"I suggested the two above with the idea we get rid of those entrenched in old ideas, they seem to me to be the best of the backbenchers so we could have some new ideas not just the same ideas from the current leadershipsyou get rid of old ideas when you let the young generation have a say

Work alongside the young alot would surprise people for sure

Who are these members of the younger generation who deserve their say? "

the old ones are that set in their ways that they won't or can't change with modern ways

Reason why needle is stuck and just coming out with with same old ideas, we have moved on from stone age

So use the younger generation where do you find these young ones?

Up and down the country ask the people after all they supposed to be there for the people aren't they?

But we all know that they just look after themselves

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By *ikey1973   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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"the old ones are that set in their ways that they won't or can't change with modern ways"

Corbyn?

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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""the old ones are that set in their ways that they won't or can't change with modern ways"

Corbyn? "

it's quite obvious it was aimed at more than one person

But guess it's alright just to aim every thing Corbyn's way but noticed that people that are doing that are the same ones that got nasty over Mrs may getting mentioned regular.

Funny how some operate isn't it.

Well hello everyone hope you are all well and healthy

I'm going back offline now may see you all soon

Danny

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By *ikey1973   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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Corbyn is the only obvious target when describing politic dinosaurs who havent moved on for 50 years lol.

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"Corbyn is the only obvious target when describing politic dinosaurs who havent moved on for 50 years lol."

any excuse to attack Corbyn lol.

Corbyn is retirement age and should retire and let the younger generation take over.

But there's plenty of others in same boat

They in they twilight years and should enjoy it

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By *ikey1973   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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Corbyn deserves to be attacked. He sides with terrorist against his own country and always has done. He is an abysmal excuse for a politician.

He has brought my party to it's knees and I detest him for that very reason. One day soon he will be gone and I hope we can recover and bring the Labour party back to the people.

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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And that's within all parties before anyone gets knickers in a twist.

I'm off for a month or two now

So hope you all stay well and healthy

And get lucky with your seX life

Best wishes

Dannyboy

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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"

Corbyn is retirement age and should retire and let the younger generation take over.

But there's plenty of others in same boat

They in they twilight years and should enjoy it "

On this one we agree Danny. I feel a lot of older politicians should retire at normal state retiring age. There are a few that are still vigorous in older age but they are the exception rather than the rule. Apart from having little time for him and disagreeing with just about everything he says, Corbyn is looking and sounding old compared to a lot of similar age.

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"it's quite obvious it was aimed at more than one person

But guess it's alright just to aim every thing Corbyn's way but noticed that people that are doing that are the same ones that got nasty over Mrs may getting mentioned regular.

Funny how some operate isn't it."

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*9al By *9al  (M) 15 weeks ago

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Churchill was over retirement age when he became prime minister, he made a few mistakes when he was younger. some politicians improve with age others do not

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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"Churchill was over retirement age when he became prime minister, he made a few mistakes when he was younger. some politicians improve with age others do not "

Churchill was the exception to the rule. Very few like him around.

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By *aravaggio  (M) 15 weeks ago

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I think older politicians, 75 plus, along with High Court Judges, should step down. There is experience and sagacity, which is fine, but with the onset of age comes an inability to appreciate that there is a need for change, and this can be damaging.

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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When you get to an certain age why would you want to change.

And why should they too

That's why they should retire at an certain age, especially in an changing world.

And should not be able to make decisions that effect an all country

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By *oondog   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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Blanket age restrictions once you're an adult are absolute nonsense!

I've met 75 year olds who in intellect and appetite for change would put many 30 year olds to shame.

I would be in favour of assessments once past a certain age that checked competence for physical and mental aptitude but blanket bans just seem silly.

I know some hospital consultants who are 80+ at the top of their game in the field of heart expertise that are regularly saving lives and pushing the art of what's possible almost every day.

In some ways they are more eager for change and achievement as they know they have little time left and want to make it count!

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"Blanket age restrictions once you're an adult are absolute nonsense!

I've met 75 year olds who in intellect and appetite for change would put many 30 year olds to shame.

I would be in favour of assessments once past a certain age that checked competence for physical and mental aptitude but blanket bans just seem silly.

I know some hospital consultants who are 80+ at the top of their game in the field of heart expertise that are regularly saving lives and pushing the art of what's possible almost every day.

In some ways they are more eager for change and achievement as they know they have little time left and want to make it count!"

Mr _oondog

Those are the very few examples you will find alot more out in general public and also in position of power that are set in their ways and just won't accept change.

Of course they will be some that will that's so obvious.

They are also plenty of 20-30 year old that will out do alot in their 60s even though they have experience on their side

That's life and before anyone has another dig I am not including myself

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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The desire for change among the elderly is a strange thing. The majority of elderly people voted in favour of Brexit as they said they wanted change, but many then revealed that the change they wanted was to return to the golden age of the 1940s !! Seems that a desire for change equates with regression rather than wanting any form of progress

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"The desire for change among the elderly is a strange thing. The majority of elderly people voted in favour of Brexit as they said they wanted change, but many then revealed that the change they wanted was to return to the golden age of the 1940s !! Seems that a desire for change equates with regression rather than wanting any form of progress "

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*ordic-knight By *ordic-knight   premium paying member (M) 15 weeks ago

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"The desire for change among the elderly is a strange thing. The majority of elderly people voted in favour of Brexit as they said they wanted change, but many then revealed that the change they wanted was to return to the golden age of the 1940s !! Seems that a desire for change equates with regression rather than wanting any form of progress "

What a quaint and interesting concept. To even remember the 1940s you would need to be well in your 80s. Plus it wasn't exactly a Golden Age. The first half was beset with wartime and the 2nd half was all about trying to recover from the devastation of the war, not to mention extensive rationing of food and other commodities.

Anyways I thought we were discussing possible future leaders of our political parties. The major ones and even the minor ones.

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By *annyboy87  (M) 15 weeks ago

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"The desire for change among the elderly is a strange thing. The majority of elderly people voted in favour of Brexit as they said they wanted change, but many then revealed that the change they wanted was to return to the golden age of the 1940s !! Seems that a desire for change equates with regression rather than wanting any form of progress

What a quaint and interesting concept. To even remember the 1940s you would need to be well in your 80s. Plus it wasn't exactly a Golden Age. The first half was beset with wartime and the 2nd half was all about trying to recover from the devastation of the war, not to mention extensive rationing of food and other commodities.

Anyways I thought we were discussing possible future leaders of our political parties. The major ones and even the minor ones."

We don't need an new leader we already have the most perfect one now

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By *ikey1973   profile verified by photo (M) 15 weeks ago

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"The desire for change among the elderly is a strange thing. The majority of elderly people voted in favour of Brexit as they said they wanted change, but many then revealed that the change they wanted was to return to the golden age of the 1940s !! Seems that a desire for change equates with regression rather than wanting any form of progress

What a quaint and interesting concept. To even remember the 1940s you would need to be well in your 80s. Plus it wasn't exactly a Golden Age. The first half was beset with wartime and the 2nd half was all about trying to recover from the devastation of the war, not to mention extensive rationing of food and other commodities.

Anyways I thought we were discussing possible future leaders of our political parties. The major ones and even the minor ones."

Good post.

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*astkenter By *astkenter  (M) 15 weeks ago

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Well said Danny. You have been shot down in flames many times for daring to criticise Daisy May (and, as you so rightly point out, by the same people who deflect your remarks to bash Corbyn at the drop of a hat) so it is fair to assume she is perfection personified.

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By *aravaggio  (M) 14 weeks ago

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"The desire for change among the elderly is a strange thing. The majority of elderly people voted in favour of Brexit as they said they wanted change, but many then revealed that the change they wanted was to return to the golden age of the 1940s !! Seems that a desire for change equates with regression rather than wanting any form of progress "

The golden years were actually the MacMillan years, "You've never had it so good". I fail to see what was so golden about the war years and the immediate aftermath that you refer to.

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By *annyboy87  (M) 14 weeks ago

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"Well said Danny. You have been shot down in flames many times for daring to criticise Daisy May (and, as you so rightly point out, by the same people who deflect your remarks to bash Corbyn at the drop of a hat) so it is fair to assume she is perfection personified."

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